Roasted Butternut Squash Soup

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by Amy Flanigan on December 2, 2010 · 24 comments

My sister, Jen, is practically an extension of this blog, I mention her so often. So imagine my excitement when she agreed to come on over and show you how lovely she is. In her own words. If you’re nice, she might even humor me again. Put your hands together….

I do not have a blog, and I do not Tweet; however, I do love to cook, and after several invitations from Amy to do a guest post, she finally wore me down.

It must be the timing. Fall is my favorite season (hey, it’s still fall – I technically have two weeks left!), I had a butternut squash in my veggie basket, and I love butternut squash soup.

California’s temperatures finally dropped to soup levels, and now I get to put on my flannel lounge pants when I get home from work, and I drag out my favorite beat up, old down throw (the one that makes my husband cringe). Yeah…I was pretty much giddy while making this soup the other night. It came out so thick and creamy and butternutty.

And bonus, for those of you who are trying to cut calories, or can’t have dairy; there is no cream or butter added – the squash is what makes the soup so rich and silky.

This recipe fits the bill to be included in the Very Culinary archives, too. It’s easy, fast, and yummy. Seriously, the most painful part is trying to cut the squash open (will someone please invent a butternut squash peeling tool…pleeeze. OXO? Anyone?)

You can actually buy a butternut squash and keep it in a cool, dark place, for up to a month. But why put off something so delicious?

Roasted Butternut Squash Soup
Serves 6-8
Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 1 hour

Ingredients
• 1 butternut squash (about 3 pounds)
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 3 teaspoons salt
• 1 teaspoon black pepper
• 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
• 1 large yellow onion, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
• 3 stalks celery, chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)
• 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
• 6 cups chicken broth
• 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
• 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
• 1/2 cup freshly grated parmesan

Directions
Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Cut the squash in half horizontally; then cut both pieces in half vertically, so you have four pieces of squash.  Clean out the seeds and cut the bottom half into two more pieces (you will now have six pieces of squash).

Rub 2 tablespoons of olive oil over the squash, then sprinkle with 2 teaspoons salt and the pepper. Put squash on a baking sheet skin side down, and roast for 30 minutes, or until you can easily pierce with a fork.

In a Dutch oven or large stockpot, heat the butter over medium heat. Add the onion, celery, and sage and sauté, stirring occasionally until the vegetables are translucent and tender (about 10 minutes).

Use a spoon to remove the squash from the skin and add it to the stockpot with the vegetables, along with the broth, nutmeg, cayenne pepper, and 1 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat.

Using a blender or food processor, blend the soup in batches until smooth.  Return to the pot and keep warm.  Top with parmesan, and croutons, if desired.

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{ 23 comments… read them below or add one }

Alex January 4, 2012 at 9:17 am

i hear ya on cutting the squash. Here’s a tip, put it in the microwave for 30-40 seconds, it’ll soften the skin and make it so much easier to cut up!

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Amy January 4, 2012 at 9:49 am

Great tip, thanks Alex!

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Dani H December 5, 2010 at 11:55 am

Wow! I could have guessed that you’re Amy’s sister – you both have a similar “voice” ~ why don’t you tweet? You should come join the party. Great post, great recipe. Your sister is one of my favorite people in the whole world, btw. Sweetest woman I know. Great job, Jen.

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Jude December 4, 2010 at 8:11 am

Hey Jen, I’m just now seeing your post, sorry for being late to the game. This is a recipe I might attempt (ask Amy, I’m inept in the kitchen), but I have a squash! And directions say I can use a blender! I’d substitute chicken stock for veggie.

Thanks for the guest post. This sounds so good now that we’re approaching single digits in MN.

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Jen December 3, 2010 at 9:59 am

Debbi – I love that about this recipe too. And, I like that you can make it into a vegan recipe if you substitute the chicken broth with vegetable broth and the butter with olive oil.

Cheryl – Yea! Thanks!

Lisa – Awww. Yeah, I’m super lucky to have Amy as my sister. She’s the best in so many ways, and now she’s practically right down the street! Yes…happiness reigns….

Hi Mom – What makes me deliriously happy is now Amy is close enough to share everything she cooks! And, yes, you would love this soup.

Quay Po – The soup really is very yummy, but Amy’s picture makes it look even more inviting!

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Quay Po Cooks December 3, 2010 at 6:56 am

Amy, how wonderful to have your sister do a guest post. The bowl of soup looks fantastic!

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Mom December 2, 2010 at 7:33 pm

Well, one person on this side of the Benecia Bridge would love this soup. I might just make half a recipe or wait for your leftovers! I agree with Lisa about not having a sister, but it makes me deliriously happy that you and Amy are such good friends (and great cooks).

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Lisa@The Cutting Edge of Ordinary December 2, 2010 at 5:57 pm

Ok having your sister post makes me long for the sister I never had *sniff*. I’m the only girl in the family and I was always envious of my best friend who had 2 sisters! 2!! All I wanted was one! I think it’s lovely that Jen is here and is sharing her soup. Butternut ANYTHING rocks in my book.

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Cheryl December 2, 2010 at 5:26 pm

It does look so rich and creamy, I would never guess there was no cream, etc! Love it!

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Debbi Does Dinner Healthy December 2, 2010 at 3:56 pm

LOVE butternut squash! I like how this is very light, without a bunch of cream. Nice! Thanks!

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Jen December 2, 2010 at 1:59 pm

Shulie – Thank you! This has been a fun experience.

Melissa – Hi there! Thank you for the welcome. I think I have a few more fitting Very Culinary posts I can do…if Amy will have me. ;o)

Kathleen – Oooh…electric knife! Me likey! We have one at home. Another option I’ll have to try.

Anita – I hear ya! I’m looking to having this soup many more times this winter.

Natasha – Thank you!

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5 Star Foodie December 2, 2010 at 1:26 pm

Roasted butternut squash soup sounds so warming and wonderfully delicious! Excellent recipe!

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anita December 2, 2010 at 12:41 pm

thank goodness butternut squash is a winter squash so it will be around for a while…it’s my favorite and that bowl of soup looks fantastic!

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Kathleen December 2, 2010 at 12:17 pm

Thanks, Jen! I, too, have a butternut squash on my counter and will be honoring it by using it in this recipe. In terms of peeling a squash — no tips there — but I do use an old electric knife that my grandma gave me (you know the one…two serrated blades that click into the plastic base) to cut all hard squash. In my experience, it is much easier and much safer than using a regular knife.
Thanks for the wonderful post and for sharing this recipe.

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Melissa December 2, 2010 at 10:58 am

Hi Jen! So nice to have a guest post from you here. Please come back again. :)

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Jen December 2, 2010 at 10:52 am

Joanne – I think your peeler has joined an old paring knife of mine.. Do you
remember the video Amy posted for the OXO Mango Splitter? Yeah, that’s me
after trying to peel one of these suckers. So painful!

Jay – I think this is the only thing I’ve ever made where you didn’t ask me
to add some sort of meat to it *and* asked me to make it again! Smooch!

Andrea – I will have to try this next time. Thanks for the tip!

Lisa – Hi! If you do make it, I promise you won’t be disappointed. :o)

Pam – Thank you! I’m having fun reading all of the comments.

Cheryl – The blogging type of writing is new to me, so thank you. I hope
the squash enjoys it new home as much as you do!

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Cheryl December 2, 2010 at 10:49 am

Your entire family has the writing and cooking gene! Thanks for sharing your soup recipe Jen (I just happen to have a butternut squash sitting on my counter top that needs a new home) I printed it out.

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pam December 2, 2010 at 10:44 am

Great guest post!

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Lisa December 2, 2010 at 10:35 am

Well hello there Jen – we do feel like we know you! I’ve noticed a lot of butternut squash soup recipes over the past weeks but never got around to making any of them. This is the one! I swear. And I hear ya on the butternut tool!

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Andrea December 2, 2010 at 10:33 am

Squash-peeling tip from Lynne Rosetto Kasper, of the Splendid Table: halve the squash lengthways, then cut one-inch strips from each half, then peel the individual strips. It’s not nearly as frustrating as trying to peel off a large expanse of squash rind. Been there, done that. Argh. The OXO vegetable peeler did the trick for me, by the way. It was almost easy.

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Jay December 2, 2010 at 10:14 am

As the husband of said writer, I have to attest that this soup is FANTASTIC!!! Thick and rich without the cream (i.e fat) that plagues most other soup recipes. Perfect on these cool fall days (okay, that’s a realitive term here in California). Try it alone, or with your favorite sandwich. We had it with our favorite paninni (prosciutto, mozzarella, and tomato). So good I took a magic marker and drew a happy face on my stomach (okay, not really, but I thoght about it).

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Joanne December 2, 2010 at 9:45 am

I totally second you on the butternut squash peeling tool Jen. I tried to use a potato peeler the other day. And after that experience, I had to hold a memorial service for it. Sigh. Lost in the line of duty,

This soup sounds absolutely delicious! I love that it has no cream in it. i think I’m overdue for a butternut soup post…need to try this!

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foodwanderings December 2, 2010 at 8:22 am

Oh Amy, This is such a fun post. Your sister definitely got a voice! :) Love the soup! Right up my alley,a s I never use cream which is good but it is mainly due to flavor preference and experiencing th epure flavors of the vegetables. Shulie

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